Fellowships

Fellowships

Work Programmes for 2018

Universal Service Obligation (USO) Study – duration 3 months

Background

The CTO is a membership-based organization committed to using information and communication technologies (ICTs) appropriately and effectively for development (ICT4D). Most member countries are interested in learning more about deployment of Universal Service Obligation (USO) frameworks that are efficient and effective in their jurisdiction.

During the recent Commonwealth ICT Ministers Forum in London in June 2018, the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation (CTO) was mandated to conduct a study to understand how CTO member countries have deployed USO funding structures and utilization of the funds, the challenges they are facing, and their goals and plans for the future. It will also draw on the work of other nations to understand trends in the field and identify examples of where the funds have been utilized to substantially increase access.

Scope of the Fellowship

The Fellow will manage the stakeholder consultation in order to translate the outcomes of the USO study to specific framework of actions and then promote the adoption of these actions in the Commonwealth and beyond.

Activities

Week 1 – 4
Review the current USO schemes across selected Commonwealth countries.
Weeks 5 – 8
Propose possible amendments/enhancements for the scope and extent of Universal Service Obligations that could be adopted by the Commonwealth to address current gaps/issues and enable universal access to broadband across Commonwealth nations.
Weeks 9 – 12
Propose an appropriate Framework with the necessary Technical, Operational and Financial parameters/models for ensuring broadband universal service and access.
Digital Currencies Regulation – duration 3 months

Background

Virtual currency, also known as digital currency, is a medium of exchange not authorized or adopted by a government. There are many different digital currencies being used over the internet, the most commonly known being a crypto-currency named Bitcoin. As an increasing number of people get involved with cryptocurrencies in some way, particularly retail rather than professional investors, governments and regulators have taken a keen interest on the industry.

The crypto-space has continued to develop with initial coin offerings (ICO) and blockchain technology beginning to be used in large corporations.  The developments have brought a varied response from regulators across the world, including a number of Commonwealth countries. Each authority has looked at various parts of the crypto-world from mining to trading and assessed how they should be regulated.

This study aims to identify emerging issues and challenges relating to digital currencies regulation and propose a framework that can be adopted across the Commonwealth countries, to enable use of good practice in regulating digital currencies.  These considerations will include, and not limited to – exchanges, trading and mining; Crowdfunding and ICOs; and emerging financial products.

Scope of the Fellowship

The Fellow will identify emerging issues and challenges relating to digital currencies regulation and proposed framework that can be adopted across the Commonwealth countries.

Week 1 – 4

Review the current digital currencies ecosystem to determine the nature and scope of digital currencies and identify areas of the ecosystem that should be regulated.

Weeks 5 – 8
Benchmarking Review of existing legislation across selected countries which regulate the various areas of the digital currencies ecosystem.
Weeks 9 – 12

Propose an appropriate Framework for regulating digital currencies ecosystem holistically with the necessary principles and measures that provide a safe environment for users but doesn’t stifle innovation.

Critical Information Infrastructure Protection (CIIP) – duration 3 months

Background

Today, there is an increasing understanding for the need to protect the critical national infrastructures such as roads and rail networks, power stations, airports etc, and any cross-border infrastructures such as gas or oil pipelines and water supply systems. It is even more important however to protect the Critical Information Infrastructures (CII) such as telecommunications and data networks, financial systems and process control systems, because these don’t just cross borders, but are connected to every other part of the world, through the Internet and other networks. That means they are all dependent on each other’s security, as the weakest link can cause vulnerabilities for many others. It is therefore of ever-increasing importance to us all.

This project aims to develop a national framework that can be adopted for Critical Information Infrastructure Protection (CIIP) for the Commonwealth countries such that all stakeholders understand how to identify, assess the risk and secure their CII, understand their roles and responsibilities in executing a holistic and coordinated approach to protecting CII services from cyber disruptions, and ultimately be able to better secure their cyberspace.

Scope of the Fellowship

The Fellow will develop a Commonwealth Guide for Developing National Frameworks for CIIP which will provide Commonwealth nations with the knowledge and guidance to develop their own national frameworks for CIIP and ultimately enable these countries develop a better understanding of how to go about developing their own national frameworks.

Activities

Weeks 1 -4
Review the CIIP ecosystem of selected countries the aim of identifying CII operators, stakeholders, owners, the state of CIIP and existing gaps, as well as current ideas on CIIP principles, measures, roles, responsibilities, etc.
Weeks 9 – 8
Compilation and analysis of findings from preceding research to synthesise recommendations on CIIP principles, measures, roles and responsibilities for addressing identified gaps and enhancing CIIP within the Commonwealth.
Weeks 9 – 12
Finalisation and validation of an appropriate CIIP Strategy and Action Plan Framework for CIIP incorporating comments and inputs from selected peer reviewers and Commonwealth countries.

 

ICT Capacity Development Programme (CDP) – duration 3 months

Background

Over the last 30 years CTO has delivered over 3,600 bilateral training and consultancy projects, covering every aspect of the telecommunications industry including the abovementioned courses, training over 38,000 professionals in 33 countries of the Commonwealth including Cameroon. For further information on the courses CTO has delivered in the past 2 years, please see our Course Catalogue: http://www.cto.int/training/course-catalogue/.

Through unique strategic training and expert advisory services, CTO assists governments, regulatory agencies and operators around the world to rapidly acquire the necessary internal capacity and know-how to help them achieve their goals. Given our unique experience and competencies, the CTO is best placed to deliver the abovementioned courses in terms of both technical approach and cost.

This project aims to restructure the Programme for Development & Training (PDT) at the CTO, to enable the CTO to deliver improved and effective ICT capacity development training to its members. capacity to deliver effective ICT capacity building across the Commonwealth, resulting in increased ICT expertise across the Commonwealth.

Scope of the Fellowship

The Fellow will review the current PDT programme, review its procedure and processes, liaise with the Capacity Development stakeholders at the CTO, including Liaison Officers (LOs) from selected member countries and develop an implementation framework for the reviewed PDT programme.

Activities

Weeks 1 – 4
Conduct an ICT Capacity needs assessment across the Commonwealth and mapping this against current CD programme (Programme for Development & Training – PDT) to identify gaps in CD as well as ICT capacity building requirements of Commonwealth nations.
Weeks 5 – 8
Developing a Capacity Development Strategy which would describe the new vision of the Programme for Development & Training (PDT), guiding principles and main approaches for building ICT Capacity across the Commonwealth, Strategic directions, funding requirements, etc.
Weeks 9 – 12
Develop an implementation framework which will enable the successful execution of the Strategy, including proposed systems and processes for delivering the PDT programme at the CTO.
Improving ICT Sector Stakeholder Engagement – duration 3 months

Background

Being a fast-evolving field, ICTs require strong and effective engagement amongst stakeholders, if its full potential is to be realised. Stakeholders involved in ICT at national level, need to be constantly updated about the developments in the sector so that their impact could be properly assessed, suitable intervention designed and implemented. The two key strategies for this are membership action plan (MAP) and facilitating links between stakeholders themselves.

Scope of the Fellowship

The fellow will identify emerging issues and challenges relating to CTO membership and how to improve the engagement strategy and benefits programme for CTO members.

Activities

Weeks 1 –4
Study the generic structure of a National ICT sector, and identify the role of key actors in public sector and private sector in selected Commonwealth countries.
Weeks 5 – 8
Survey the ICT sector with the Commonwealth using both CTO’s internal sources and Global knowledge bases such as the International Telecommunications Union; and develop a Membership Action Plan (MAP) of CTO membership categories and offerings and their focus areas.
Weeks 9 -12
Develop an Implementation framework which will enable the CTO membership programme to successfully engage with ICT sectors within the Commonwealth countries.

More Information:

For more details on the CTO Fellowship programme please contact:
Dorothy Elangot, Human Resources
44 (0) 208 600 3800
44 (0) 208 600 3819